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Russia couples with IAEA for nuke safety

Publish date: July 30, 2007

NEW YORK - Russia's industrial safety regulator said Friday it would establish a system for exchanging information with the UN nuclear watchdog this year to ensure radiation safety, RIA Novosti reported.

The system will help Russia to comply with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s radiation safety and security codes, which was revised as part of counter-terrorism measures following the September 11th 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States.

"Rostekhnadzor and the IAEA are planning to set up in 2007 a system for radiation safety regulating bodies to exchange information in this sensitive field," said, Yevgeny Anoshin, an aide to the head of the regulator.

The official said a pilot project had been launched by the service to set up the database and train experts from regulatory authorities in Russia and other former Soviet republics. At the request of the Russian watchdog, an IAEA mission will look into its operations in 2009.

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